A VIDEO

After a successful MEDS workshop in Ljubljana in August 2012 this blog is no longer in use, since it was created only for promoting MEDS 2012 workshop in Slovenia.
For more info of the following workshops please check official MEDS website. Next workshop 
will be held in Lisbon from 3 to 18 August 2013.

A PHOTO

Po uspešno končani organizaciji MEDS delavnice, ki smo jo slovenski študentje organizirali avgusta 2012 v Ljubljani, sporočamo, da zaključujemo z obveščanjem na tem blogu, saj je bil le-ta namenjen zgolj delavnici v Sloveniji.
Vabimo vse, da se nam s klikom na sliko pridružite na uradnem MEDS Slovenia blogu, kjer boste deležni vseh informacij o prejšnjih in prihodnjih dogodkih in delavnicah MEDS! Prijave na naslednjo delavnico v Lizboni že potekajo.

A TEXT POST

MEDS 2012 Realized projects

01. A CONVERSATION OF SPACE

Tutor: Alice Lewis, Australia

We are human. Through the process of being we generate space and spatial change. The physical form of our own bodies combined with our individual psychologies corroborates the surrounding built metropolis. Each and every form subconsciously affects and alters the existence of that which is adjacent to everything else. The contemporary landscape is in equal parts formed by human occupation as well as the built mass of urbanity. We operate together in a repercussive, tangible network of parts to forge one coherent organism. We are the city.

‘A Conversation of Space’ documents a short exploration into the modalities of the human forms (1) occupation of the built metropolis. It delves into the effect of our formal presence on the urban landscape. As a result, the research also touches on the possibility of employing a corroborative understanding within spatial design.

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The work and exploration itself was executed as a design workshop at the 2012 Meeting of European Design Students in Ljubljana, Slovenia earlier this year. Over a period of ten days, a group of ten students hailing from a range of European universities and design-based disciplines were asked to conceptualize, construct and test a series of garments that operated as spatial research tools. Each garment explored a different aspect of how the human form occupies and affects space, acting as a tangible, malleable machine to generate knowledge on a one-to-one body scale. Over the designated ten day period the research team developed three garments; all able to be worn and all addressing the design criteria. The garments were tested within the streets of Ljubljana. It was a contemporary context within an ancient metropolis. These garments were intended not as landscapes themselves, but as research tools – repercussive extensions of the human form. Through methods of exaggeration and subtraction the garments accentuated the bodies’ effect on space, on other bodies and on the contemporary city.

(1) For the purposes of this research ‘human form’ is used to describe the physical form of a human body, its recurrent movements and its individual psychology.

Exploration 01.1: Excess space

Excessive Space looks at the true physical area taken up by the human body, as well as the residual space assigned to the human form through the socially accepted movement of limbs and self. The garment constructed to research this mode of occupation operates through two distinct phases:

The first phase saw the garment as a restricting piece. The wearer was only offered the movement of their own legs while the arms, back, neck and head were set firmly in position. This allowed the body in question and surrounding spectators an understanding of the true impression of the solid body form on the urban space. As the body began to move – an action triggered by the instinctual use of the arms and the ability to bend and shift it’s form through all joints, the stitching that held the body so taut gradually gave way and so entered phase two.

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Phase two of the Excessive Space research machine saw nets of fabric fall from the sleeves, effectively creating a loose wing-like structure between each arm and rib cage. The loose, trailing structure of the fabric pulled at the body and floated on the air. It extended the body form to incorporate those areas that are not physically carved but that are often socially accepted as being within to a particular body space.

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https://vimeo.com/50979166

Through a progressive process of elimination and exaggeration embodied in one garment, the notion of excessive space was clearly defined. Both the wearer and the observers could clearly make out the progressive change of space, as well as the recurring spatial effect the body had on the surrounding context.

Exploration 01.2: Personal space

Personal Space can be solitary or interactive relative to our occupation in relation to other bodies. This garment explores notions of proximity, inclusion and solidarity within the public realm. Through a series of triangulated pyramids that pack neatly into a back-pack, the wearer initially has complete governance over the modality of the garment itself. As the garment expands, through the bodies’ intervention, it becomes almost a necessity to incorporate other bodies for physical support. This instigates different modes of social interaction and proximities between individual bodies, thus exploring the effect of the human form on other similar forms as well back onto its own.

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Through the process of wearing, this garment also explores the notions of ‘public’ and ‘private’ within the busy urban context. The creation of a tangible yet partially rigid structure that can be set up as a tent-like structure lets one insert a private space into the public realm. This then generates information in relation to ownership of space, how ownership might be achieved and how this opportunity might be employed within spatial design.

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https://vimeo.com/50285420

Exploration 01.3: Residual space (Traces)

Residual Space is the space left behind once our physical form has moved on. As we shift our bodies within the built landscape they leave traces; marks of where they have been and what they have done. Traces could take physical form, or could be a memory within another individual’s body. A Trace could even be the removal of a part of what existed before. This process happens in every moment, with every form. Residual Space is what makes the city ever tangible, ever changing.

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The garment constructed to address the notion of residual space is based largely on the principle of exaggeration. Utilising and exaggerating the natural process of abrasion within the garment design, wet paint in primary colours is distributed sequentially through the wearing process. This action leaves behind a visible trail of the bodies’ occupation of space. Each turn produces a different mix of colours; each material underfoot provides a different hue. While the garment itself was designed to disintegrate with use, the traces it leaves become more vibrant, lasting far beyond the time of physical occupation.

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https://vimeo.com/50979018

The design of the garment itself also created a somewhat un-intentional net structure, which swept up parts of the surrounding metropolis. The garment collected leaves and twigs, stones and litter as the body carried it through the metropolis. While the notion of landscape projecting traces onto the body had been touched on briefly during the initial conceptualization, it had not been purposely applied to the design of the made garment. This naturally occurring process foregrounds the notion that not only do our bodies leave traces on the built landscape, but that built landscape also leaves traces on the bodies that corroborate it. 


02. JAM

Tutors: Marta Szoke & Brigitta Nachtmann, Hungary

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03. SYNESTHETIC EXPERIMENT 

Tutors: Irem Cicek & Umut Fisek, Turkey

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04. SENSE YOUR CITY

Tutors: Janine Teuchsen, Germany & Camilla Siggaard Andersen, Denmark

Description:

The workshop aimed to interact with Ljubljana by provoking the citizens to use their senses. The provocation was to take form of small design projects that could intervene with the regular city life.

The workshop had an outcome of seven tangible projects, plus a few extra smaller experiments.

Wrap the trees: This project was designed to make the inhabitants pay more attention to the nature in their cityscape, by stirring their senses of sight and touch. This was done by making an art installation around a tree in a park.

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Cushioning urban furniture: We noted how the public spaces with benches and bridges were heartily used by the inhabitants of Ljubljana, but also how the dominant materiality of stone and concrete lacked comfort and warmth. The team set out to cushion the urban furniture in order to soften the city to the sense of touch.

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Reflecting the light: Ljubljana is beautiful city, but we found that the inhabitants rarely paid attention to the many attractive qualities of their home. In order to make people really see, we created a couple of distractions, blinding them with sharp light reflections to draw their attention to their sense of vision.

Water shadows: By using water as a medium for stencil drawing we created temporary graffiti art in the city, which quickly evaporated under the scorching sun. The idea was to make people aware of the “ghosts” of their city – the things which have been but which time has erased; A sort of appeal to the sixth sense.

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Human wall: We noted the many narrow alleyways in Ljubljana, and the sensation of emerging from a tight space into a grander street or square, and we wanted to enhance this sensation. We made a wall of people behind a blanket which would hinder an easy passage for pedestrians.

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Dining by the river: Ljubljana is dominated by the river, but in a particularly nice place there was a noticeable lack of resting opportunities. We designed a table and two seats for the broad fence along the bank, to enable pleasant pauses at this location.

The smelly box: The idea behind the smelly box was to take all the smells of the market place and put them into one monumental box, with the aim of stirring people’s curiosity as well as their senses. The attached chalk enabled people to communicate their experience at the box with others, in order to create a sense of community around the project.

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Thank you to Andreea, Cansu, Caterina, Cormac, Peter, Paul, Tom, Elisa, Kathrin, Ezgi, Laura, Lucie, Athina, Andrew and Kevin for your enthusiasm!


05. LET YOUR EAR BE YOUR COMPASS! 

Tutor: Tamas Butora, Hungary

Description:

It started with a couple of keywords, feelings, moods about the life, feelings of the life, as blind. I was looking for participants, who are very sensitive for these things, and i was curious about the ideas, opinions after a little experience. Luckily all of my participants were sensitive, we did a lot of special experiences and games, whitch are based on the other senses and the trust. We were getting close to each other. The ideas were awesome, the minds were very shiny, the participants were getting exited. The work was very hard, the different feelings and ideas putting in one installation. The very sofisticated senses and feelings were very intensive, each of us wanted to feel the materials, the tools, and the happiness of the building. We found us a very common and usually situation: how can we realize our poetic idea, what kind of materials we need, and where. How can we compare the idea with the real world? The less type of the materials and the non-construction solving were our way. 

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Each of us made a one day experience, especially how can we be blind, how it works? We wanted to feel, what does it mean to be blind. Each of us had different impressions. Each of us found different movements comfortable: sounds, touches, fragrances…Each of us found a target in Ljublana, what they found perfect to orientate and representate the idea. With these imressions borned ideas, wishes. We spent pretty much times with the designig to find the best solution for our installation. The two kind of materials what we used had a opportunity, means we bilt something which is not a construction, ergo target independent. We chosed a very calm and hidden place in the city, with the main element; the water.

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The non-construction used ropes and textile. Cutted textile sheets hanged abow the water, cover the visual world, visualisated a kind of seeling. Under these seeling we hanged two hammocks. In a lying situation can see the seeling, can touch the water with hands and can hear the noise of him, can see the seeling’s plural white color. Sometimes the wind is blowing, the seeling is moving…the feeling is a flow, like with closed eyes, what we see.

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Relaxing, flowing, calmness, the sound of the environment, the fragrance of the environment…what we felt. I hope the others have felt also.

We discovered a new world, and this is the best, what it happened. Special thanks for my team:

Ioana Lupascou, Mirela Gancheva, Tímea Ferth, Daniel Haarhof, Ondrej Novák.


06. A ROOM WITH A VIEW 

Tutors: Wendy Teo, Malaysia & Linda Hagberg, Sweden

Description:
Concept 

The Floral Pavilion emerges from the ground like a patterned landscape formation sheltering visitors from the surrounding world. Inspired by the oriental shoji screen, a translucent light filtering screen, the varying depth of the floral pattern creates an interactive shadow display.

Design Process

This project examines an experimental structural system resulting in a continuous transparent skin, not differentiating the wall from the roof. The radiating cell network of the pavilion, originating from the growth pattern of floral petals, varies in size and depth of its components to create a gradient pattern of more or less dense areas of the skin.

The form is generated by a network of voronoi clusters projected towards a centre point and then trimmed against an inner and outer surface. Using parametric software, variables such as the position of the centre point and the shape of the intersecting surfaces can be easily modified to test a number of iterations.

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The individual cells of the network are then unrolled and numbered to facilitate the assembly process. 1:10 scale paper and cardboard prototypes were produced to test the structure, materiality, lighting, fixing and weatherproofing methods.

Construction - Combining Craft and Digital Fabrication

With 12 amazing participants from Cyprus, Czech Republic, Portugal, Romania and Serbia the 3x3m pavilion was constructed and delivered to Tabor Square. The 8mm corrugated cardboard was cut by hand (due to lack of suitable cnc-router), numbered according to the digital model and folded to form cells. Each cell was then glued to the adjacent cell and assembled into clusters which were brought to the final site. With annotated clusters and digital 3d model at hand the assembly on site was completed in less than 2 hours.

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The Floral Pavilion is a temporary space for meditation and relaxation in Tabor Square, the cultural heart of Ljubljana. The characteristics of the space, the lighting condition and shadow pattern, change ephemerally based on the exterior lighting and environmental conditions. 

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7wOWUWUd4Dw

Team Members: Ana Rita Tomé,  Elena Constanti, Francisco Leão Peres, Giorgos Kyriazis, Iona Mitrea, Katarina Vukovic, Milica Exy Vujanic, Mirka Baklíková, Oana Anghelache, Sandra Lup, Thisbe Christou, Xristiana Xristou


07. GET LOST – GET FOUND

Tutor: Agnieszka Ufnal, Poland

Description:

Basic point to create the pavilion was the analysis of unconscious although obvious needs of every human being. As a social unit we have the right to choose the way of interaction with surroundings. The elementary factor of being human is functioning in some society and interactions with it although individuality and solitude are equally important. The aim of the installation was a try to find a balance between both.

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GET LOST – GET FOUND pavilion gives a choice for users. This floating organic structure implemented into modern space of museum square has been cut with a path which divided the pavilion into two zones- ‘human interactions zone’ with low extensive seat for a few people and ‘solitude zone’- partly covered shelter for only one person. There is also a possibility to pass through the space without any conscious contact with it.

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The additional aspect of the pavilion was its sensory elements which influent its spatial perception- openwork timber construction, which only unconsciously gives a feeling of space division; black felt which covers both pavement and some parts of the construction which makes an impression of being inside (carpet and furniture illusion) and encourages to stay.

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Last but not least- plastic bottles- one of the most common elements in our contemporary world which causes an undiscovered yet feeling of touch sense by forcing straight contact with many of them.


08. SOFT&SPIKY

Tutor: Gheorghe Madalin, Romania

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09. SENSE OF EQUILIBRIUM

Tutors: Anna Wejkowska & Lukasz Balcerzak, Poland

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10. SOUND FOREST

Tutors: Przemyslaw Chimczak & Alicja Sawicka, Poland

Description:

The Sound Forest installation is a response to the issue of sound in public spaces. Unfortunately, in modern cities we lost the opportunity to explore the range of sounds that must compete with noise pollution due to traffic. This problem inspired us to explore the city and introduce a new aural experience. The project was conceived to maximize participation of students in the design process.

Tutors created a basic conceptual framework, selected a limited palate of materials and researched on two potential sites prior to the commencement of the workshop. While the group discussed every aspect of the design together in detail, these boundaries proved helpful in focussing the thoughts of the group such that all potential designs shared a common conceptual spirit.

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In the centre of the Slovenian capital, the installation became part of the revitalization process of Park Tabor. From the beginning of the design process, it was important that the installation should intrigue and entice, but not be an overpowering presence, that it should not impose itself on its surroundings, but rather that it should grow out of them, and once completed, continue to respond and change with the wind.

The construction of installation is based on simplicity and multiplied use of basic elements. The location had a great impact on the shape of the project, because the trees were used as only base of designed structure. 3000 pieces of hand cut MDF hung on 2000 metres of linen string created altogether a complex and intriguing installation.

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The border between inside and outside is blurred, establishing two different kinds of spaces: a welcoming exterior and enclosed interior. Big enough for two people to stand, the interior creates an intimate atmosphere. The visitor, immersed in the music, created by both wind and person, surrounded by ever-changing dappled shadows, is able to forget about the busy aspects of city life. The visitor reconnects with the specific conditions of the spot on which they stand: wind passing through surrounding trees and installation, the crunch of leaves underfoot, the glorious brightness of the sky, framed by a small oculus overhead. Free from other distractions, the visitor’s mind is freed to pursue its own thoughts. For the young and for the old, the installation proved to be an intriguing toy, a musical instrument. For the duration that the visitor was inside, the space became his, with each visit, the room became something else.

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http://vimeo.com/48623683

The Sound Forest Group was composed of 15 people representing different countries and disciplines. The members were: Alexandra Ana, Fifine Bereiziat, Esme Brooker, Przemyslaw Chimczak, Nikol Chr, Argjent Ferati, Jack Hughes, Argjire Krasniqi, Ilir Krasniqi, Marina Nastou, Manu Negrila, Nicholas Ransome,  Alicja Sawicka, Petya Vatsova, Ruiting Zhang. 

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11. A SPACE WITH ONE WALL

Tutors: Rae Moore & Mike O’Dell, Ireland

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12. HEAR-DROP

Tutor: Simona di Vincenzo, Italy

Description:

The HearDrop project aims to stimulate the sense of hearing through the sound created by falling water drops. The idea underlying  the project is to create a connection between sound and water, trying to produce music through water droplets that fall on different materials from different heights.

Participants chose between three proposals, symbolic forms that represent three possible developments of the initial idea: the cave, the river and the dragon.

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The first two could have developed within a cubic volume, while the third, the chosen form, is shaped like a portal, with the advantage of a greater interactivity with the audience.

The wooden structure conceals a circuit in which water can flow freely, composed by two water tanks, a garden hose and seven drippers. The part of the water system suspended in the air is installed into a sinuous shape that resembles the body of a dragon, the symbol of the city of Ljubljana.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfxq4bpmHHw

Through the use of parametric modeling software, two hundred “scales”, each one of a different shape from the others, were cut from sheets of metal and Plexiglas, forming a pattern with holes where the water drops fall and constituting a sort of “project inside the project”, a small experiment of digital manufacturing.

After a fall of about two meters the water drops end up beating five wooden columns, each covered with a sheet of different materials: plastic, metal, wood and the water itself. The body of the columns amplifies the sound and acts as a sounding board, making the sound louder.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upibBAgrazM&feature=youtu.be

The water drops falling on them from above produce various sounds: different rhythms by different time rates, different timbres and tones by different materials. The result is a mix of sounds that chase each other and overlap in the style of African music, rhythmic and swinging.

Participants: Diana Stoicescu, Elen Arakelyan, Susanna Minasyan, Klára Paterová, Radu Gabriel, Martin Málek, Elena Dimitrova, Kevin Verreijt, Başak Akgün, Ina Hristova, Paulina Piechota, Elsa Richnau, Lora Nurkova, Katerina Gondova


13. ONOMATOPOEIA  

Tutor: Lukasz Pienczykowski, Poland

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14. (RE)DISCOVER FULLY THE LIFE 

Tutor: Mariya Baykova, Bulgaria

Description:

Choose your path! 2 options, 2 entries; a decision to make, similar to other simple everyday situations.

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Closed or open

Hot or cool

Still or windy

Intimate or public

Dark or bright

Narrow or wide

Low or high

Step bare-feet on the ground and feel it!

Flat or rugged

Soft or hard

Noisy or quiet

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Touch the surrounding walls. Experiment with your senses. Can you navigate yourself without your sight?  Feel the difference between each segment you enter. Where do you feel safe and cozy? Explore the world; create yourself!


15. WHAT DO YOU SEE? WHAT DO YOU HEAR?

Tutors: VAV architects, Ireland & Spain & Australia

Description:

We selected a site,of tranquil serenity and calmness, where the fusion of a river scene encompassing the idealistic setting of ancient willow trees at river’s edge and a gentle flowing river proved interestingly challenging.

The challenge arose insofar as we sought to add to the perfection of the almost perfect. Our aim was through  minimum juxtaposition, to enhance the scene by adding to and possibly improving on, through non obtrusive or intrusive interaction with which already existed.

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For this reason our material selection needed be such that it would permit a gentle insertion with and into the surrounding environment. We therefore selected to use plastic. This transparent material, which its almost invisible characteristics permitted the fusion envisaged whilst at the same time permitted reflective and refractive traits. This essentially became the aim of the project. By using the reflective and transparent properties of the plastic we created a huge kaleidoscope which acted as a tool to explore and capture the views above, below and indeed all around the site.

The kaleidoscope canopy itself we cantilevered out over the gentle flowing river and also the existing steps down into the river bank. Our objective was to reinvent the function of these existing steps. Previously only used as access to the river bank, they now became a very functional a tiered seating area in which people could venture beneath the kaleidoscopic structure and be rewarded with the distorted views of the world above. The canopy structure was specifically designed to engage with people from above and below.

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From above, views of the meandering glistening river bathed in sunlight are projected onto the canopy, as are the rolling waves as they pass below the plastic surface all being reflected along the plastic itself giving the canopy an almost liquid interpretation. On drawing closer to the canopy reflected distorted images of the people nestled below become visible. The juxtaposition of the existing idyllic setting onto the plastic becomes an almost surreal experience and leaves one questioning both the reality and the reflected. From below the views become inverted. Willow tree, drifting clouds, the protruding metal structure and passing people above, observed from beneath the structure become distorted through the plastic kaleidoscope composition.

Furthermore the installation is in a constant flux of change. The time of day, seasonality and weather all become instruments of importance to and for the canopy. The transparency of the material ensures the canopy becomes nearly invisible on dull days and then glows and radiates when lit up by direct sunlight on bright days. At night the passing by traffic and surrounding street lights are projected across its surface and it was also intended that images and other media could be projected onto the canopy at night to create a surreal futuristic setting. The canopy has the capacity to evolve and become many stages interdependent on its many influences..

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The canopys’ composition itself is composed solely from triangles like the kaleidoscope. The pattern density and rhythm was composed to achieve two primary objectives. Firstly, as the canopy cantilevers out over the river the density decreases in relation to the distance from the structural supports. Secondly the methodology in which the observer forms his interaction with the kaleidoscope impacts on the pattern density.

As you draw close to the canopy and journey down to the seated area below the pattern becomes denser and you experience the effects of the kaleidoscope on a more micro level. But once passing beneath and taking ones seat  under the canopy the pattern opens up and the play of views is experienced on a grander scale against the surrounding context.

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The Structural system implemented was chosen for its minimal impact on the surrounding environment. Once the projects lifespan is deemed over, the project can be removed leaving no traces whatsoever behind. Four rectangular steel column sections were erected and secured using the existing steel structure of the fence and the Kaleidoscope canopy is hung off these pillars on steel chord similar to the principles used in cable stayed bridges.


16. THE WATER TEMPLE

Tutor: Kieran Donnellan, Ireland

Description:

The pavilion is a non-‘white wall’ exhibition space whose character is meant to inspire exhibits of both existing work and custom pieces that relate to the concept that shaped the pavilion. That concept was derived from the history of the river that flows through Ljubljana, the Ljubljanica, and in particular the change over time in the ways that locals interact with their river.

Located in a narrow riverside park, the curved and sharp lines of the wooden pavilion evoke the atmosphere of a boat that has been placed, seemingly at first, loosely among a line of trees beside a sluice gate built by Jose Plecnik. Upon further investigation, the subtleties of the orientation and the nature of the eccentric geometry become obvious. Acknowledging the hierarchy in the directions of flow of foot-traffic on the site, the pavilion sits close to the waters edge while reaching out through the tree-line towards pedestrians. As it breaks this line, the northern side of the pavilion dissolves, encouraging movement towards the entrance of the pavilion, while framing views of the sluice gate in the process. The covered entryway is an exaggerated portico that addresses Plecnik’s monument. This creates a strong tension in a way that seems at once both formal and informal.

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The sliding door of the pavilion has no handle. Fluted carving, a reference to the features of the monument, offers grip over the entire surface of the door. Sliding back, it reveals the curved surfaces of the interior. The wooden floor of the entry lobby ends upon striking the elliptical curve of the interior exhibition space, where the most intriguing aspect of the concept is discovered. The floor of the exhibition space is a pool of water. This is a reference to the way in which the Ljubljanica river was experienced by locals in the past. The river lapped right onto some of the streets and public spaces, and the use of small boats was part of daily life. That moment of stepping from dry land onto a water based vessel is imitated in the Water Temple, when a visitor takes their first tentative step onto the sliced tree-trunks which are placed, unfixed, throughout the pool. Movement in the exhibition space is carefully balanced and considered, as in a small boat.

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Exhibitors have the freedom to decide where the tree-trunks should be placed, or to use alternative steps for their exhibitions. Work can be mounted on steel supports fixed to the primary vertical structural members, and placed in or on the pool. The pavilion will remain in its current location for between 6 months to a year. A series of exhibitors will be allowed to use the pavilion in turn. Anybody interested in exhibiting in the Water Temple can make inquiries to MEDS.

The pavilion was built using CNC technology and wood bending techniques. DamaHaus used their CNC machine to manufacture the primary structural components, all made from pine. This included cutting a mixture of traditional blind tenon and exposed dovetail joints. The curved walls were made on-site by cold-bending and glueing 2 thin layers of wood together following immersion in the Ljubljanica river.

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The twelveplus team was composed of 17 people from a variety of different countries and disciplines. The members were: Agata Madurowicz;  Agata Motyka;  Andreas Von Knobloch;  Anže Jagodic;  Catriona Kinghorn;  Florence Declaveillere;  Irem Karadeniz;  Kieran Donnellan;  Luca Giacobazzi;  Maria Prodromou;  Marta Vrankar;  Martina Zaman;  Mitja Škerjanc;  Paul O’ Brien;  Sarah Mogensen;  Valerio Bianchi;  Zsolt Sarkadi. The team name is a reference to the fact that while the principle design was developed by a core group of 12 people, there were contributions from many others including the MEDS organisers and DamaHaus team.


17. THROUGH THE DIGITAL EYE

Tutor: Blaž Jamšek, Slovenia

Human eye is a complex organ and so are all the processes that take place in the brain afterwards. All those processes make our vision subjective, but despite that, we take it as reality. To “see what we see” and then put it on paper is thus a real challenge. Compared to the eye, a film or a digital camera has its limits in the range of light it can reproduce or the amount of time it can capture, but with different techniques we can get close or even exceed what our eye can detect.

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Participants had the opportunity to learn all the basic and advanced functions of a digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera. Together we took a look at the theory of composition, light & contrast, perspective, time dimension, dynamic range etc.  and afterwards they also tried it out in practice. As days passed by their skill and knowledge grew… and so did all the stories and motives that their ‘‘digital eye’’ had captured for us to see!

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A TEXT POST

Water temple on Open House Slovenia

Ogled vodnega templja, ki je bil v avgustu zgrajen na MEDS delavnici v Ljubljani, bo možen v nedeljo 7.10.2012 med 11. in 13. uro v sklopu dogodka Odprte Hiše Slovenije 2012. Vljudno vabljeni!
http://www.odprtehiseslovenije.org/index.php?m_id=program&w_a_id=328&lang=eng&lang=slo 

Water temple, a pavilion which was built during the MEDS workshop in Ljubljana in August 2012, will be presented on Open House Slovenia 2012.
Visit time: 
Sunday 7. 10. 2012 at 11:00, 12:00. Kindly invited!

http://www.openhouseslovenia.org/index.php?m_id=program&w_a_id=328&lang=slo&lang=eng

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Vabljeni na otvoritev Vodnega templja in razstavo realiziranih projektov na letošnji delavnici MEDS!

A TEXT POST

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A TEXT POST

MEDS installations at BA 2012

Slovenian MEDS team presented this year’s workshop at international architectural conference Big Architecture 2012 in Ljubljana with 2 different installations. A virtual tour is also available.

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A VIDEO

Our promotional video that was displayed at international architectural conference Big Architecture 2012 in Exhibition and Convention Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

The video contains:
- footage of the previous MEDS workshop in Istanbul, Turkey
- creation of our exhibition pavilion for BA (time-lapse photography)
- promotional video for transformation of TAM TAM City panels.

A TEXT POST

MEDS 2012 Projects

01. A CONVERSATION OF SPACE

Tutor: Alice Lewis, Australia Description:

This workshop investigates the correspondence that exists between our bodies and the existing urban landscape. Based on the notion that the human body is as much a part of the contemporary metropolis as the built fabric itself, the sensorial corroboration of body and space is fore grounded and explored through a series of projects that take the form of made garments simultaneously supported by a human body as well as specific urban spaces. Throughout the course of this workshop, participants design, construct, test and evaluate these garments. This process of making and testing at a scale of 1:1 in various locations throughout Ljubljana begins to build an understanding of our personal position within the landscape as generators of space and of spatial change. These garments aim to evoke a (re)realization of the spatial dialogue at play between us (our body and psychology) and those elements that compose the existing built landscape in order to understand the sensorial aspects of both body and space as well as inform future design practice from a distinctly body-scale.


02. JAM

Tutors: Marta Szoke & Brigitta Nachtmann, Hungary

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QGpqh1Qi0w&feature=youtu.be

Description:

This interactive installation affects all at once to our 3 senses, the effect of the sound changes the first impression on the way of view and touch. This object group is based on this conception what takes advantages of hearing and the music’s cuntructive effects to make a social space. People can produce the music/sound of Ljubjana at this place. The units of this creation are moveable, consecutive so we can make a wide variety of space. The element is an instrument which can produces 6 different sounds/noises because the 6 sides of a cube. Can be used stand-alone or built-in a wall or one by one to a furniture for sitting and each person can play on his/her temporarly owned furniture. Owing to mobility it can be formed to a related construction, so if noone will use them, these can serve the sight of Ljubjana to every public space. At the time of this workshop, the participators will form/design the cubes’ surfaces, textures and materials.


03. SYNESTHETIC EXPERIMENT 

Tutors: Irem Cicek & Umut Fisek, Turkey

http://vimeo.com/41211199

Description:

When our lives start in mother’s womb, our sensations start flourishing at the same time. We can hear, we can feel, we can taste. Then what about the reality? To what extend are our experiences real? Does everybody else feel, taste, see and hear as in the same way as we?  In that case Synesthesia the disease of mixing senses  becomes an experiment way of design. Senses become an intersection way of life. Feeling, smelling, listening, etc. are all connected with each other and they will be change to other sense. You will be able to create your own experiment with different senses. You will touch but you will influence it via smell or you will create a sculpture from what you listen. Does it sound interesting? of course. After this workshop, you will be able to think differently and your senses will be work on different way. Let’s test your senseABILITY! 


 04. SENSE YOUR CITY

Tutors: Janine Teuchsen, Germany & Camilla Siggaard Andersen, Denmark

Description:

The workshop SENSE YOUR CITY aims to interact with Ljubljana by provoking the citizens to use their senses. The provocation takes the form of small design projects that intervene with the regular city life. Five teams are created to undertake the task of designing interventions that interfere with people’s sense of smell, taste, touch, vision or hearing. The designs are placed in the city and the reactions they create are documented in the way the team chooses. All registrations, designs and reactions are presented on boards as an exhibition of Ljubljanian citizens’ relations to their senses before, during and after our interventions. 

OBSERVE —> DESIGN —> CHANGE —> PRESENT 

The focus of the workshop is to make the participants work actively on creating ideas that will interact with the citizens of Ljubljana. The many small interventions of the city life must be thouroughly and poetically documented, so that the results present themselves well in an art exhibition. It is an excersise of interfering with and mapping how inhabitants of a big city use their senses in the everyday life.


05. LET YOUR EAR BE YOUR COMPASS! 

Tutor: Tamas Butora, Hungary

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ososGyc7PhA&feature=youtu.be

Description:

Crackling, Decrepitaion, Knocking, Grating, Friction, Buzz, Warm, Cold, Jig, Blow   Intense, Mild, Cutting, Puncture, Stroke, Scrape, Bite, Tasting, Flick, Fragrant, Smelly     Sharp, Blunt, Coo, Hiss, Rings, Scratch

Noises… Voices…. Feelings. 

Words about the senses, as we know, as we feel. Senses, whitout the visual sense. We think, that it’s the most important, and the others are not so.  We were getting used to them. Could you get used to the life without your sight? Can you orientate yourself somewhere as blind? How can you start your everyday like this?

Try to discover, try to eat, try to live, try to orientate yourself in a foreign town as a blind. Listen to your feelings, and find a individual place. Marker it! Take it possession! Build a place for you, and use with your other senses, with your feelings. Find the way to home from there. Make markers! Show me your place. Drive me there. Find there all by itself.

Use your feelings, your senses, and recognize, how important is your non-visual senses. Meet the non-visual world. Let your ear be your compass!


06. A ROOM WITH A VIEW 

Tutors: Wendy Teo, Malaysia & Linda Hagberg, Sweden

Description:
The proposed investigation is inspired by Wayang Kulit, the theatrical craft of shadow puppetry of South East asia, and the Shoji Screen, the traditional Japanese space divider of translucent paper on a wooden frame. The intention of the workshop is to create a time-based performance, where light and shadow as well as the movement of objects and inhabitants form the basis of the narrative.
The strategy for the performance is based on a fundamental principle of light’s interaction with objects and textures to create a play of shadows on a layered surfaces.
Lighting      Object/Texture/Structure      Shadow/Story
Two main questions will be investigated during this process; How could this narration could be translated spatially? and What kind of layering on this spatial interface built in the 1st process progressing into narration based on the principle ? 
The sensation of the layering of shadows will be investigated as well as the viewing experience in relation to the position within the performance.
Furthermore, answering this two questions would push to a core question : 
What kind of sensation do we genuinely expect or desire from a wall?


07. GET LOST – GET FOUND

Tutor: Agnieszka Ufnal, Poland

Description:

Let’s try to create a space where people would feel like being understood and where they could fulfill that space whatever they want it to be fulfilled- to let them be part of it, not only passive users of architects ideas. To let them use their sensABILITY to do it.

So here you have a cube filled with small boxes… or maybe you prefer to have just a pure frame. It is up to you. You can take out a part of the wall and use it however you want. Or just leave the structure untouched. And because of that, the space you are create can answer to your needs. It can cheer you up and hide from the world or show you the little light in the tunnel with another person at the end. Or let you lay on it and hug you. Just like a human being. All you need to do is to compose it your way.


08. SOFT&SPIKY

Tutor: Gheorghe Madalin, Romania

Description:

There is a strong connection between touch and sight. as you look at an object, your brain not only processes what the object looks like, but remembers what it feels like to touch it as well.

Human brain captures and stores physical sensations. most of us will stay away from red iron. this is because we have a touch memory that tells us it hurts.

As we grow older our experience with touch is growing and we have less objects left to experiment. and so we tend to recall the ‘touch memory’ more.

But what if there was a contradiction? Something unexpected like soft and spiky at the same time? How would the brain react? At first sight, would it take into consideration the soft confortable part or the spiky part? This could be an impulse for exploration

THE CONCEPT OF THE PAVILION, WHATEVER SHAPE IT WILL HAVE, IS TO BRING TWO CONTRASTING ELEMENTS TOGETHER IN AN INTENT TO CHALLENGE PERCEPTION.


09. SENSE OF EQUILIBRIUM

Tutors: Anna Wejkowska & Lukasz Balcerzak, Poland

Description:

Where is the sense of hearing, touch, smell, taste, sight? It is there, where the sense of equilibrium works correctly. We shouldn’t forget about the most important sense of our body - sense of balance. Basic component of project is movement of the body and the space between it. We live in contact with the people, who create their own sensual space, where we often haven’t an access. In project, through specific lines which connect opposite walls, it is formed a kind of space, which forces movement of the human body . In this case, we feel the sense of balance associated with the sense of touch and then the sense of proprioception. Sense of balance is that sense, without which it would be hard for the other senses to be able to position the body in space. The space is designed so that you can explore the materials in specific holes, but also stimulate the movement of human body by walking between lines. Next used element in installation is SOUND. The idea is to hear the experiences of the people who are inside the space. When we are in the darkness space, words which are said, are important in imaging and describing space. It’s like audio description which is used by blind and visually impaired people to “see” the architecture and art. Between fluorescent lines let’s create the space for sense of balance and design the space for body movement. Then explore it & hear it. 


10. SOUND FOREST

Tutors: Przemyslaw Chimczak & Alicja Sawicka, Poland

Description:

Modern cities lose hundreds of natural sounds which are competed by the noise of traffic. This problem induce us to explore the city and introduce a new experience of hearing. Workshop project is considered to maximize participation of students in design process. During the workshop we will investigate the role of sound in a modern city and do a research on the types of sound and ways of creating it. In result we will create the installation which will give a chance to experience various kinds of sound while exploring it. Placed in one of public parks will offer a place to rest surrounded by music and illumination of light. 


11. A SPACE WITH ONE WALL

Tutors: Rae Moore & Mike O’Dell, Ireland

 

Description:

As a species we have created our own ideal habitat - the city. as our cities grow they intensify, and parallel to that so does the level of sensory stimulation within them. The city has become a sensory paradox: the number of sensory stimuli within the city multiplies, yet the city becomes increasingly insensitive. As individuals, we are bombarded sensually, and this overload leaves us wholly desensitized… numb. 

To enhance our awareness and experience in the city, we do not need any further stimulus, we require sensitivity. We propose to construct a sensory neutral space within the city, to reacquaint the individual with their own awareness and perception, removed from all external interference.

A space with one wall will deny our usual perception of space and environment, cleansing the senses and making us aware of ourselves again. Upon exiting the space, refreshed and soothed, the individual will re-enter the city with a new level of sensability

“Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul” - Oscar Wilde


12. HEAR-DROP

Tutor: Simona di Vincenzo, Italy


Description:

The Hear-drop pavillion is a cube that wants to explore the sense of hearing.

The idea underlying the project is to create a connection between sound and water.

In the city of Ljubljana there’s the strong presence of the Ljubljanica river. Using the profile of the river bed through the city as an attractor, a series of tubes were modeled, disposed in tangency, having different diameters and heights, in order to draw the shape of a bend of the river.

Each tube is covered with several materials such as plastic, glass, fabric, metal sheets, wood, or water itself. The water drops falling on them from above (using some paths for the water in the upper part of the pavilion or simply leaving it to drip) will produce various sounds and many different rhythms.

It will be a strong part of the work to explore all possibilities and to make researches about differences in water drop sounds: different rhythms by different time rates, different timbres and tones by different materials.

And finally, to make the experience more interactive for the public, in the pavilion may be available  some simple everyday objects to let people actively participate in creating sound.


13. ONOMATOPOEIA  

Tutor: Lukasz Pienczykowski, Poland

Description:

This project is an attempt to investigate how the structure of a material and its design/pattern determines how we interpret shape/space in a specific environment.

Such dependencies occur in the urban tissue and architecture. Similar relationships also occur in other areas of human activity, such as: fashion, graphic design, methods of masking, music, etc. These relationships also occur in nature: patterns on the fur or skin of animals, the patterns on the leaves of plants.
This phenomenon becomes more complicated when layers begin to overlap and penetrate each other. More layers are built with changing lights and shadows if the layers are translucent or openwork.

The project is a preliminary proposal for the pavilion.
The form of the pavilion and its tectonics are determined through an analysis and transformation of stimuli (visual, audio or other) provided by the city.
When viewed from different angles, the structural elevations of the pavilion appear more or less transparent. The actual shape will be distorted.
A clear picture is seen only through oblique slits in the facade, which, together with the design of the pavilion divide it into triangular planes.
A geometric design on the openwork facade suggests further transformation in the triangular divisions.
The ambiguity of solidity emphasizes the apparent lack of a visible entrance. In fact, the entrance to the interior is possible by pulling the transverse slits in the facade.


14. (RE)DISCOVER FULLY THE LIFE 

Tutor: Mariya Baykova, Bulgaria

Description:

Feel. Feel the world with all your senses for a full experience.

Five rooms to cross that offer a variety of sensAbilities.

Creating this path of slightly different “rooms” with obstacles will propose a unique circular walk, during which visitors will engage in hearing their footsteps, touching the surrounding walls, and navigating their way through the installation.

A mind-joke proposal:  Hang clouds made of OSB between the two entries. The fake clouds will symbolize the limitation of our sight and the need to rely on the other four senses to comprehend the world around us.  Be curious, explore your surroundings!

Visitors would be able to experience the installation from either of the two entries. Guests would be presented with a decision to make, similar to other simple everyday situations. Observing the tendency of the visitors could provide an interesting inside into preferences of people – begin with the opaque, dark unit or the semi-transparent, lighter one.


15. WHAT DO YOU SEE? WHAT DO YOU HEAR?

Tutors: VAV architects, Ireland & Spain & Australia

Description:

Open your eyes and cover your ears. Now close your eyes and listen to what is happening around you. You look at something in the distance and wonder how it will sound. You hear something you can not see and imagine how it will be.

Ljubljanica river, which passes through the heart of the city, is silent, almost stagnant. A river that should give life to the city is shy and unnoticed. 

We propose to restore the sound and presence of the river to the city. We will create an installation by the river which interracts with the moving water and emphaises its changing nature with exaggerated sounds. A structure suspended above the water, brushed, caressed and manipulated by the waters current. Small strands colliding and jingling with each other. Again the river will become present.

Traffic noise. Annoying, deafening at times. It flows through the streets in an endless stream, invading everything.  

We propose a shift in perception, a sensory experiment. What would happen if traffic noise would stop being annoying? We will attempt to create a new image for this sound? if we fail to see cars and instead we saw water? how will our perception of the traffic change? If we projected an image of falling water, a waterfall even against the wall of a tunnel filled with traffic, what do you hear now? a car or a  waterfall? what do you experience? violent smoke being thrown coming out of exhaust pipes or water drops with their euphoric splashing notes?

Nothing is what it seems! open your eyes, listen!


16. THE WATER TEMPLE

Tutor: Kieran Donnellan, Ireland

Description:

Ljubjiana was built in an area of marshland where a high dependence on waterbourne transport meant that the inhabitants had a very strong sensual connection with the river. Since this period, two interventions have occured to dramaticaly change this relationship between the people of the city and their river. The first was the construction of high quay walls on the banks of the river, reducing the sensual connections to that of the visual only. The second intervention was the creation of an aquaduct to tame the river and prevent flooding, which has had the effect of creating even greater vertical distance between people on the quays and the water.

My concept is to highlight the presence of water in Ljubjiana by adding the sensual experiences of SMELL, SOUND and TOUCH to the city centre, and exagerating the VISUAL play of water and light.

Upon dIscovering THE WATER TEMPLE, the SOUND of a water fountain will invite them to sit. They can then TOUCH the water, satisfying a potential desire for contact with the river. They can then use a ramp to access the upper floor of THE WATER TEMPLE which is an interior exhibition space. This space catches and amplifies the SOUND and SMELL of the water fountain underneath, while a view to the river acts as a narrative for the exhibition.

THE WATER TEMPLE is a temporary exhibition space where MEDS Participants, and local artists will display work relating to the history of the Ljubjiana River. It features a water fountain that acts as a sensual narrative for the exhibitions, and as an amenity for the general public.


17. THE EXPLORATION OF STEEL AS A SENSORY MATERIAL 

Tutor: Paul O’ Brien, Ireland

Description:

This proposal resurrects a short experiment completed by Paul O’ Brien, Sean Attley and Cormac Nolan during the Final Thesis year in DIT Bolton Street. A small perforated structure from weathered steel was designed to be used as a smoking shelter within the college courtyard.

The structure provides shelter and allows sunlight to pass through its many perforations. Sunlight gently heats the steel providing a pleasant sensory experience for the user. The structure is homogeneous, and is self supporting. The monolithic form allows for ease of construction off-site and delivery to its urban placement. The untreated mild steel will oxidise over time and will subtly change appearance. Although similar to the sculpture of Richard Serra in appearance, our steel structure will create a  usable space for the people in the city.

Method:
The workshop is for 5 - 8 participants. During the first three days of MEDS, the participants will collaborate to design the form of the structure. The form will be defined by the nuances of its context within Ljubljana. The project will be fully drawn up and specified using AutoCad and Sketchup.

This project does not follow the usual method of a student workshop as the detailed design will be brought to a metals workshop close to the city to be made by specialists; a number of participants will visit the workshop to learn metal skills whilst the remaining participants will work on the  preparation of the site. It is hoped that the structure can be constructed in a number of days and will be in place in order for all members of MEDS to document and enjoy. I aim to have the finished project published in Irish architectural periodicals upon return to Dublin.


18. THROUGH THE DIGITAL EYE

Tutor: Blaž Jamšek, Slovenia

Human eye is a complex organ and so are all the processes that take place in the brain afterwards. To “see what we see” and then put it on paper is thus a real challenge. Compared to the eye, a film or a digital camera has its limits in the range of light it can reproduce or the amount of time it can capture, but with different techniques we can get close or even exceed what our eye can detect.

This workshop is for everyone that wants to learn photography, from beginners to more advanced users. We’re going take a look at different topics and try them out in practice: composition, light & contrast, perspective, time dimension, etc. This is also a great opportunity for people to share their knowledge one with another. With your specialized field of photography you can also add additional value to this workshop.

As the workshop photographers we’ll document the MEDS event throughout the whole process. With our photographs we will be able to aid other participant in their presentations. In the end we’ll make a photography exhibition and the best shots will be published in the media.

A TEXT POST

how to become a participant?

After a successful competition for this year’s tutors, it’s time for the poster competition for participants.
If you don’t know how to become a participant, read this article and apply! The deadline of the competition is on May 14th 2012! 

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